Manufacturing Dissent Since 1996
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958massimodeangelis

The first step is to become more independent for our means of reproduction - food, houses, health, education, care, ecology - these should be our primary struggles. Because it is by holding a monopoly on the means of reproduction by capital, that they can blackmail us. Our struggle, as many feminists and eco-feminists have been telling us for years, should be to fight for autonomy and independence of our way to reproduce.

Political economist Massimo de Angelis looks beyond the escalating human and environmental disasters of capitalism, and towards a social transformation in which we pry the means of production from capital's grasp, and reclaim our labor in service of the needs of all humanity and the earth itself - while we still have time.

Massimo is author of Omnia Sunt Communia: On the Commons and the Transformation to Postcapitalism from Zed Books.

 


Episode 938

Dataism

Feb 6
Posted by Alexander Jerri
938lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:15 - Economist Geoff Mann outlines the history of Keynesianism's attempts to save capital from capitalism.

Geoff is author of the new book In the Long Run We're All Dead: Keynesianism, Political Economy, and Revolution from Verso Books.

 

10:00 - Live from Standing Rock, Dr. Sarah Jumping Eagle reports on DAPL resistance in the Trump era.

Sarah is a pediatrician and water protector, we've spoken to her twice in 2016.

 

10:35 - Journalist Michelle Chen examines Obama's mostly symbolic legacy on labor and trade.

Michelle wrote the Labor and Trade section of Jacobin's feature Assessing Obama.

 

11:00 - Legal scholar Marjorie Cohn reviews the dangerous record of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch.

Marjorie wrote the article Trump's Choice of Gorsuch Endangers Civil, Human and Environmental Rights for Truthout.

 

11:35 - Immigration researcher Karina Moreno finds a neoliberal consensus behind the border wall.

Karina wrote the article The Private Deportation Machine for Jacobin.

 

12:10 - Mathematician Paul-Olivier Dehaye profiles the use of psychometrics in political campaigns.

Paul posted the recent Medium article The (dis)information mercenaries now controlling Trump’s databases.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen mangles a thermodynamic theory of evolution.

Jeff previously got thermodynamic in Decmeber of last year.

Posted by Alexander Jerri


Here's what Chuck is reading to prepare for Saturday's show:

In the Long Run We're All Dead: Keynesianism, Political Economy, and Revolution - Geoff Mann [Verso Books]

Assessing Obama: Labor and Trade - Michelle Chen [Jacobin]

Trump's Choice of Gorsuch Endangers Civil, Human and Environmental Rights - Marjorie Cohn [Truthout]

The Private Deportation Machine - Karina Moreno [Jacobin]

The (dis)information mercenaries now controlling Trump’s databases - Paul-Olivier Dehaye [Medium]


And further recommended reading:

If Your Party Doesn’t Appeal To Young People, It Will Wither And Die - Nathan J. Robinson [Current Affairs]

On the Travel Ban: An Interview with Darryl Li - Atreyee Majumder [Cultural Anthropology]

On Borders / Race / Fascism / Labour / Precarity / Feminism / etc. - Angela Mitropoulos [Base]

Refugees are already vigorously vetted. I know because I vetted them - Natasha Hall [Washington Post]

With Muslim Ban, Trump and Bannon Wanted Chaos, but Not Resistance - Laleh Khalili [Truthout]

Beyond Resistance – Defeating Trump’s Burgeoning Dictatorship - Elliot Sperber [Counterpunch]

Police in Chicago Public Schools operate with no special training and little oversight - Yana Kunichoff [Chicago Reader]

Interviews for Resistance series - Sarah Jaffe [In These Times]

Episode 937

Ad Spaced

Jan 30
Posted by Alexander Jerri

 

The Marriage of Schlock And Augustus

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

Imagine you are an ape, living in a vineyard with your small tribe. The grapes growing there are ripe and sweet. Humans have not been seen in these parts for several months. The weather is warm. Are you not delighted?

This is just one of the mental exercises you can employ to rejuvenate and salve your spirit after catching a glimpse of the Thing currently occupying the office of President of the United States.

It happens. You've done your best not to think about it, but it's impossible to avoid an inadvertent reminder now and then that one of schlock-capitalism's most grotesque abominations is right now operating inside the Oval Office – inside one of the most august theatrical settings in our governmental drama – scribbling his shitty signature on morally deformed executive orders like he runs the joint.

It's a jolt to the system to see him there, that weird-ass bullshit piece of shit, with his shitty suit and shitty hair and his puckered ruined horrible face, warped by decades of being wrapped over a tiny, hard little pea-gravel crumb of a soul. Watching him meeting with GOP Senators, as little respect as I have for that bunch, is nevertheless jarring, like walking in on a grumpy cat in a dunce cap using your hotel room toilet.

One of the foundational principles of our government, it always seemed to me, was that the President was to be considered a human being, a citizen among citizens, not a special human being, but a normal human being, not a nobleman, not an aristocrat, not a monarch invested with Divine Right. That he was nevertheless accorded a colonial slave-built mansion with its own bowling alley and other luxuries came off, at least to me, as counter to the egalitarian spirit of the social mission of the USA.

Having so self-indoctrinated, I'd believed myself immune to feelings of undue respect for the office per se. Respect for the man occupying the office could be earned through respectable behavior, but there was nothing particularly sacred about the seal, the desk, the office, the house. Those were only worthy of respect as the accoutrements of a respect-worthy man inhabiting them.

Richard Nixon brought disgrace to his office, but even so, he never seemed unworthy of actually sitting at the desk. It was just a desk. He wore a suit and tie, like any other desk-sitting... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri

On This Day in Rotten History...

In 1932 – (85 years ago) – Japanese aircraft began an unprovoked bombing of the Chinese city of Shanghai. Japan had invaded northern China a year earlier and established a puppet state there called Manchukuo, as a base from which it could attack the rest of China. Now it followed up its bombing of Shanghai with an attack on targets around the city by thousands of ground-based troops. The bombardments and fighting between Japanese and Chinese forces continued for several weeks until the League of Nations helped negotiate a cease-fire. Some thirteen thousand Chinese were killed, and about five thousand Japanese. Along with being one of the important precursors to World War II, the battle marked Japan’s establishment of the so-called “comfort women” system, which forced local women into sexual slavery to keep Japanese troops less inclined to revolt against their superiors.  
 
In 1964 – (53 years ago) – an unarmed US Air Force T-39 carrying a flight instructor and two pilots took off from the US air base in Wiesbaden, West Germany, on what was called a routine training flight. Within an hour the airplane flew off course, over the so-called “Iron Curtain” into East German airspace, and the crew did not respond to the air controllers’ frantic calls. The plane was shot down by a Soviet jet fighter and all three crewmembers were killed. The incident sparked an ugly Cold War dispute. Soviet diplomat Giorgi Kornienko called the flight “a clear intrusion” and a “case of gross provocation.” Meanwhile, US Secretary of State Dean Rusk called the downing of the plane “a shocking and senseless act,” and Senator Hubert Humphrey called it “an act of brutality, force, and premeditated slaughter.” But US Senator Barry Goldwater, a former Air Force pilot and a Republican candidate for president, expressed skepticism. He told reporters: “It’s kind of hard to believe that all your navigational equipment would go out at once on that plane.” 

In 1986 – (31 years ago) – at Cape Canaveral, Florida, engineers from aerospace contractor Morton Thiokol urged managers at NASA not to launch the space shuttle Challenger, warning that cold weather and ice conditions at the Cape would prevent key components of the launch vehicle from working safely. But the... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
937lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:15 - Live from Kabul, journalist May Jeong reports Afghanistan's homegrown peace process.

May wrote the article The Patient War: What awaits Trump in Afghanistan in the February issue of Harper's.

 

10:00 - Civil rights lawyer Flint Taylor explains why the Chicago Police Department is reform-proof.

Flint's latest writing is Chicago's Brutal Example for Jacobin.

 

10:35 - Attorney Brian Foley draws the blueprints for a legal resistance to the Trump administration.

Brian is a lawyer practicing in Philadelphia, we'll also talk about his piece I Have A Scream for Counterpunch.

 

11:05 - Journalist Natasha Lennard makes the case for confrontation and disruption against the fascist threat.

Natasha wrote the recent pieces Neo-Nazi Richard Spencer Got Punched—You Can Thank the Black Bloc and Anti-Fascists Will Fight Trump’s Fascism in the Streets for The Nation.

 

12:05 - Editor Vyvian Raoul outlines strategies for reclaiming the public space from advertising's visual pollution.

Dog Section Press is releasing the book Advertising Shits In Your Head: Strategies for Resistance in February. You can read the first chapter here.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen defines the Schlock Doctrine.

Hopefully this changes everything.

Posted by Alexander Jerri

Here's what Chuck is reading to prepare for Saturday's show:

 

The Patient War: What awaits Trump in Afghanistan - May Jeong [Harper's]

Chicago's Brutal Example - Flint Taylor [Jacobin]

I Have A Scream - Brian Foley [Counterpunch]

Neo-Nazi Richard Spencer Got Punched—You Can Thank the Black Bloc - Natasha Lennard [The Nation]

Advertising Shit In Your Head: Strategies for Resistance - Anonymous [Dog Section Press]

 

And further recommended reading:

 

Key Trump Donor Stands to Profit from Order to Approve Keystone XL, Dakota Access Pipelines - Steve Horn [DeSmog Blog]

Think the Women's March wasn't radical enough? Do something about it -  Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor [The Guardian]

The decimation of the Democratic Party, visualized - Phillip Bump [Washington Post]

Assessing Obama - Jacobin

Trump Knows You Better Than You Know Yourself - Das Magazin [Antidote Zine]

Inaugurating a New Movement - Michell Chen [Dissent]

Ordoliberalism and the Death of Liberal Democracy - Salvage Zone

Episode 936

Down In Flames

Jan 21
Posted by Alexander Jerri

The Disposable People

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

After the superwealthy have taken control of everything, what is going to happen to all the excess people? I mean, assuming the superwealthy continue on their current course of commandeering all the resources and phasing out human labor, what's going to happen to all the people they don't need? If those people begin to grow food for themselves, should they find somewhere to do so, won't the superwealthy eventually find out and take the arable land for their own profit? If they hunt and fish and gather, won't their land be taken away and turned into hunting, fishing, and gathering resorts for the superwealthy? And the pre-existing communities: if they aren't picturesque enough to bring in tourism dollars, and they can't farm and they can't get jobs and they can't hunt, fish or gather, how will they live?

I've heard estimates to the effect that 40% of the people on Earth at the moment are unnecessary to the people who matter: they're unemployable, they're in the way, and their misery isn't even necessary as a warning to the existing workforce not to ask for too much. 40% of humanity could be shed just like that. It's a wonder someone or some corporation or cabal of corporations hasn't taken care of this by now.

They're probably waiting to see how large the percentage can grow. It's entirely possible that the superwealthy could whittle the number of people necessary to keep them ecstatically comfortable down to, say, a few thousand per person who matters, or PWM. And better to massacre all of the expendables in one big lump than to do it piecemeal. Better from a PR standpoint. Then again, maybe they're actually doing it piecemeal as we speak.

But if so, they're doing it very slowly and in an extremely disorganized way. It's worth examining why they haven't taken more definitive, prompt action to eliminate the expendables.

 It probably wouldn't be much fun to be a PWM without the ability to go to, say, a town on the Amalfi Coast, where people are living as you assume they've lived for a long time, for dinner on a pleasant piazza overlooking the Mediterranean where you are served a bowl of the most divine soup, and the jasmine petals fall from the trees into your soup, and you are meant to eat them, they compliment the soup deliciously. And you wander the narrow streets with your trophy spouse, passing picturesque... read more