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886jeffdorchen

I believe that Hillary, like Bill, is a Big Chill candidate, who thinks all that 'love and peace and imagine no possessions' stuff in the 60s was just a whole lotta crap. That's just how she describes Bernie Sanders's plan to move money from the over-compensated financial class to the under-compensated human class. She's a realist. I think Bernie is a realist too. I think he knows that if you go in looking to make only a small, incremental difference, you end up making even less of a difference.

Jeff Dorchen gets around to endorsing Bernie Sanders, but not before revealing Bill Clinton's greatest trick, what he likes about Hillary's Big Chill pragmatism, what he doesn't like about Hillary's Big Money opportunism, the limits of selective realism, the challenges of snowball course alteration, and the joys of monotonous warnings about economic inequality.

 


Posted by Alexander Jerri
887lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM or stream at www.thisishell.com

 

9:10 - Pension expert Nancy Altman explains why the problem with Social Security isn't Social Security.

Nancy is author of Social Security Works! Why Social Security Isn’t Going Broke and How Expanding It Will Help Us All from the New Press.

 

10:05 - Our Man in London, David Skalinder views the alien US election from his spot on Mars.

David counts the focus on inequality as a victory for the left "though it remains to be seen how far that victory will take us..."

 

10:35 - Live from Sao Paulo, Brian Mier reports on the sudden intersection of abortion rights and the Zika virus.

Brian just returned from Recife where he covered the story with a major European TV network we can't name yet. NDA!

 

11:05 - Writer Tom Slee explores the harsh new frontiers on the edges of the sharing economy.

Tom wrote the book What's Mine is Yours: Against the Sharing Economy from OR Books.

 

12:05 - Historian Lily Geismer explains how the upper-middle class seized control of the Democratic Party.

Lily is author of the article Atari Democrats in the newest Jacobin.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen's head can't figure out why we need figureheads.

One week after sort of endorsing Bernie Sanders too!

Posted by Alexander Jerri

Here is what Chuck is reading to prepare for Saturday's show:

Social Security Works! Why Social Security Isn’t Going Broke and How Expanding It Will Help Us All - Nancy Altman [New Press]

What's Mine is Yours: Against the Sharing Economy - Tom Slee [OR Books]

Atari Democrats - Lily Geismer [Jacobin]

Episode 886

Accelerationalism

Feb 6
Posted by Alexander Jerri

On this day in 1934 – (82 years ago) – several French right-wing anti-parliamentary political groups staged demonstrations in Paris to demand the resignation of France’s left-leaning coalition government. When the groups converged on the Place de la Concorde, the assembly turned violent, quickly escalating from rock-throwing to bullets as rioters and police exchanged fire. In the end, sixteen people were killed, some two thousand were injured, and the French government resigned — soon to be replaced by a so-called national union government composed mainly of conservatives, including Marshal Phillipe Pétain, a French World War I hero who would later become leader of France’s Vichy regime, which collaborated with Nazi Germany during World War II.

On this day in 1951 – (65 years ago) – during a rainstorm near Woodbridge Township, New Jersey, an overcrowded nine-car train carrying more than a thousand evening commuters derailed as it crossed a temporary wooden trestle in a construction area without heeding warnings to slow down from fifty miles an hour to twenty-five. The train’s weight and speed caused several cars to jump the track, tumble down an embankment, and crash onto the street twenty feet below. Other cars were left hanging off the tracks, partly suspended in the air — and many of those passengers jumped to their deaths, wrongly assuming that the shiny, rain-washed pavement below them was a river. Eighty-five people died and five hundred were injured in what was the third most deadly train wreck in American history.


On this day in 1971 – (45 years ago) – during his live-televised walk on the moon as commander of Apollo 14, NASA astronaut Alan Shepard got out a six-iron club and two golf balls he had smuggled aboard the spacecraft, and used them to take sand trap shots on the lunar surface — thus providing the world with an unforgettable illustration of white American privilege, and a memorable emblem of fun and frivolity to go with the Apollo program’s price tag, which in 1973 was reckoned as some twenty-five billion dollars, or well over one hundred billion in today’s money.


On this day in 1998 – (18 years ago) – President Bill Clinton signed legislation renaming Washington National Airport after former president Ronald Reagan. The bill had been hurriedly passed by the Republican-controlled Congress to be ready for signing on Reagan’s birthday, in spite of what the Washington Post called “strong opposition” by the governor of Virginia and other DC-area business and political leaders — both Democratic and Republican — who considered the change unnecessarily partisan and divisive. One Republican congressman who voted for the renaming, Thomas M. Davis of Virginia, even admitted: “Most of my constituents won’t stop calling [the airport] Washington National.” The change forced DC-area authorities to spend thousands of dollars on new highway and transit signs.

Posted by Alexander Jerri
886lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM or stream at www.thisishell.com

 

9:10 - Historian Premilla Nadasen reviews Bill Clinton's racialized attack on welfare.

Premilla wrote the new Jacobin article How a Democrat Killed Welfare.

 

10:05 - John K. Wilson examines the identity politics behind the Democratic primaries.

John was recently referenced in Clarence Page's column What this politically (in)correct campaign tells us.

 

10:35 - Anthropologist Andrea Muehlebach finds water and democracy at odds in Italy.

Andrea wrote the ROAR Mag article How to kill the demos: the water struggle in Italy.

 

11:05 - Political theorist Nick Srnicek makes the case for a world without work.

Nick is co-author of Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work from Verso Books.

 

12:05 - Attorney Nicole Phillips reports on Haiti's election that never happened.

Nicole just returned from Haiti, where an election was cancelled two days before voting.

 

12:45 - Old Socialist Jeff Dorchen tells Hillary's whippersnappers to get off his lawn

Don't know how socialist it is to for Jeff to claim it's "his lawn" but I guess it's his segment.

Posted by Alexander Jerri

Here is what Chuck is reading to prepare for Saturday's show:

How a Democrat Killed Welfare - Premilla Nadasen [Jacobin - login required]

How to kill the demos: the water struggle in Italy - Andrea Muehlebach [ROAR Magazine]

Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work - Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams [Verso Books]

Nicole Phillips Breaks Down Haiti Electoral Crisis [audio interview] - Africa Now

 

Episode 885

Bases Covered

Jan 30
Posted by Alexander Jerri

On This Day in Rotten History...


On this day in 1607 – (409 years ago) – the Bristol Channel, between England and Wales on the British west coast, was hit by an enormous flood that swept across two hundred square miles of coastal land and killed an estimated two thousand people. Contemporary accounts describe how the sea first mysteriously receded from the beach, then rose in waves that shot bright sparks, which were quickly followed by “huge and mighty hills of water” moving “faster than a greyhound could run.” Though the exact cause of the disaster remains unknown, many experts studying the written accounts, as well as physical evidence in the area’s soil, contend today that the flood was probably caused by a tsunami. They also warn that the area around the Bristol Channel is vulnerable to being similarly flooded again. 

On this day in 1956 – (60 years ago) – the home of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King in Montgomery, Alabama, was bombed while he was away at a meeting with organizers of the Montgomery bus boycott. The bomb destroyed the front porch and blew out the facade and front windows. Dr. King’s wife, Coretta, and his first child, Yolanda, both of whom were inside the house when the bomb went off, were uninjured. Three days earlier, an anonymous telephone caller had threatened to kill King and destroy his home if he did not call off the boycott. After the bombing, Dr. King urged his supporters not to respond with violence. Montgomery city officials, meanwhile, expressed outrage and vowed to catch the perpetrators — but no arrests were ever made.

On this day in 1968 – (48 years ago) – the North Vietnamese army and the Vietcong launched the Tet Offensive, a campaign of coordinated attacks that caught by surprise the forces of South Vietnam and the United States, who had expected a lull in hostilities during the traditional holiday of Tet, or lunar New Year. Within days, the surprise offensive swept more than a hundred South Vietnamese towns and cities, including Saigon, the southern capital — and it continued for months, with massive casualties on both sides. The Tet Offensive was a shock to the US government, which had previously believed Vietnamese nationalist forces incapable of such strong resistance. Public sentiment in the United States soon turned strongly against the war in Vietnam, and against US president Lyndon Johnson, who then chose not to run for a second full term in the 1968 election. But that didn’t prevent Johnson’s successor, Richard Nixon, and his secretary of state, Hammerin’ Hank Kissinger, from dragging out the carnage for another seven years — or from spreading it into the neighboring countries of Cambodia and Laos.

Rotten History is written by Renaldo Migaldi.

Posted by Alexander Jerri
885lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM or stream at www.thisishell.com

 

9:10 - Anthropologist David Vine explains why more military bases make the world less safe.

David is author of Base Nation: How U.S. Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World from Metropolitan Books.

 

10:05 - Our Man in Dublin, Will Lynch reports back from an almost deadly, Guinness-less rainforest trip.

The story involves venomous spiders and a botched terror attempt, but I think the Guinness thing was the hardest for Will to handle.

 

10:35 - Journalist Curt Guyette investigates both the Flint water crisis and its coverup.

Curt posted the article Gov. Snyder Tainted by Flint Water Crisis for the Michigan ACLU's Democracy Watch blog.

 

11:05 - Historian Kathryn Olmsted traces the roots of conservatism to the farmlands of Depression-era California.

Kathryn wrote the book Right Out of California: The 1930s and the Big Business Roots of Modern Conservatism.

 

12:05 - Writer Salma Hussein reflects on five years of activism, revolution and repression in Egypt.

Salma recently posted The Egyptian revolution #Jan25: Important Readings and What you must know about the Egyptian military industrial complex at her blog In Quest For Justice.

 

12:45 - Jeff Dorchen is relieved to learn that the state has no obligation to provide quality.

I think you might find he actually isn't relieved to find that out. Might be an ironic statement. Jeff's a real trickster.

Posted by Alexander Jerri

Here is what Chuck is reading to prepare for Saturday's show:

Base Nation: How U.S. Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World - David Vine [Metropolitan Books]

Right Out of California The 1930s and the Big Business Roots of Modern Conservatism - Kathryn Olmsted [The New Press]

What you must know about the Egyptian military industrial complex  - Salma Hussein [In Quest For Justice]