Manufacturing Dissent Since 1996
New interviews throughout the week
1066williamirobinson

We're seeing worldwide - this is critically clear in the United States - these evermore omnipresent systems of mass social control, repression and warfare being promoted by the ruling groups for the purpose of containing either the real or the potential rebellion of the downwardly-mobile working classes and the surplus humanity - those who have been locked out of the global economy and made marginal.

Sociologist William I. Robinson points toward a new understanding of global capitalism in the 21st century - as the transnational capitalist class accumulates wealth and power through chaos and predation of the working class worldwide, only a borderless and democratic socialist movement can win a new world for all people on this planet.

William wrote the book Into the Tempest: Essays on the New Global Capitalism for Haymarket Books.

 

Jeff Dorchen
Jul 27
1066jeffdorchen

The twittering and the dread.


Posted by Alexander Jerri
1280px young boys are being taught by an old man sitting at a table wellcome v0039299

We’re so disconnected from nature that we have an ambivalence toward climate change.

Climate change will change everything including our politics and economy.

The businesses that caused climate change have moved on from denying climate change’s existence to cashing in on fighting climate change.

Ocean levels rising due to climate change are creating new shorelines.

In Puerto Rico, things are a lot worse than we know.

With hurricane season approaching, it’s likely to keep getting worse and worse and worse.

Australia is keeping immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers out of sight and out of mind.

The Honduran elections ended with deadly violence and a strengthening of a grip on power by the US-backed government.

Trump's wall can be destroyed a lot easier than bad immigration policies can.

Payday loan and rent-a-centers gouge the most vulnerable with ridiculous interest rates.

Lead-poisoned water isn’t only for Flint any more. It’s come to a community near you.

Bipartisan support for means-testing of social services is hurting the poor.

Andrew Cuomo sides with the very conservatives who he claims to challenge at every opportunity he can in the media.

The olympics are bad for cities.

Appalachia is a lot more progressive than liberals think it is - and you could see that in the West Virginia teachers’ strike.

Liberalism has completely and utterly failed.

Labor protests in Iran that are about a lot more than just the protesters bottom line.

Unions invest pension funds in Wall Street which works hard to undermine workers rights, pay and benefits.

That future is now under threat more than ever with the recent Janus ruling by the Supreme Court.

As mandatory arbitration destroys workers’ rights, corporate wellness programs are bad for workers’ health.

The largest US corporations who are engaging in billions of dollars of worker wage theft to line the pockets of their fabulously wealthy CEOs.

There is a capitalist way to get some of that power back. Maybe.

And the tech industry is starting to unionize, too.

The concentration of corporate power at companies like Amazon have been horrible for consumers, too.

Localization might combat fascism.

Maybe radical geography can change the world - and ‘zones to defend’ could be part of that radical geography.

We have been cursed by bipartisanism and BOTH parties agreeing on the bad ideas embraced by neoliberalism.

... read more

Dec 29 2018
Episode 1035

Speak and Sell

Dec 22 2018
Posted by Alexander Jerri

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

"Some men are intimidated by strong women." This has been a glib, empty, un-self- aware dose of pabulum on the left for at least the last thirty years. A moment's reflection reveals its nonsensical nature. A moment's reflection is something frowned upon on the left, unless it's reflection of an acceptable dogma or bland agreement. Yes, strong people intimidate weaker people. But you're not being woke or clever or anything remotely laudable by pointing it out. Capitalism exacerbates that dynamic, incidentally. Your strength is both increased and rendered more intimidating by capitalism. Consider that, if you can.

Yes, I'm intimidated by strong women. Why shouldn't I be? Like strong men, they can reject me socially, hurt me physically, humiliate me, or merely exert power over me to my detriment. I'm supposed to feel ashamed of being intimidated? Blow me. I've got enough negative feelings just being intimidated, I'm not going to judge myself for it. Especially not by your criteria.

Yes, I've intimidated others, and I'm not proud of it. There are ways to defuse the intimidation dynamic, if you want to, if it's important to you, but it takes work, and some humility on your part. You have to be secure in yourself. And yet humble at the same time. That's the burden of the strong. That's how you see beyond your privilege.

Don't worry, I'm not very good at it either.

This is the duty, in my opinion, of everyone with privilege, whether white, male, rich, beautiful, or otherwise gifted, exalted, or accomplished. The people who understand this are incredible, you know them when they reach out from their strengths and lift you up simply through the act of reaching. Not everyone has the ability, and even fewer want to have it. It's a singular strength, the ability to be humble and open about one's strengths, because we live in a culture that rewards bullying and egoism and not caring. Winning. We're all about winning, and we have a very narrow definition of victory.

But in some ways, that's the kind of animals we are. We jockey for prestige, we cultivate the best people as friends, we learn the tricks of making ourselves useful and helpful, or trusted, or admired, or highly regarded. And if we fail at these things, we lose. We become poor or lonely. In short, as a species, we are cliquish a-holes.

We also congratulate ourselves on not being the types that are... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
1035lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:20 - Writer John Pat Leary translates the new language of capitalism in the 21st century.

John is the author of the forthcoming book Keywords: The New Language of Capitalism from Haymarket Books.

 

10:00 - Live from São Paulo, Brian Mier explains what Jacobin got wrong about pre-coup Brazil.

Brian is a co-author of the article How the US Left Failed Brazil for Brasilwire.

 

10:35 - Sociologist Dylan Riley explains what Donald Trump is  - if he's not a fascist.

Dylan wrote the article What Is Trump? for the New Left Review.

 

11:05 - Writer Tony Wood explores Russian politics beyond the shadow of Vladimir Putin.

Tony is author of Russia Without Putin: Money, Power and the Myths of the New Cold War from Verso Books.

 

12:05 - The Hopleaf's Michael Roper reviews a down year in the craft beer industry.

Michael will dig into brewery closings, the hops bubble and a general decline in beer drinking - Chuck isn't contributing to that last thing.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen can't win for losing, can't lose for winning.

 

Posted by Alexander Jerri
Chuckbook2018

Chuck picks his 18 favorite books from the 100+ he read for the show this year:

 

Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression - and the Unexpected Solutions

Johann Hari / Interview


Why Liberalism Failed

Patrick J. Deneen / Interview


Neoliberalism

Julie A. Wilson / Interview


Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race

Reni Eddo-Lodge / Interview


What’s Wrong with Rights?: Social Movements, Law and Liberal Imaginations

Radha D'Souza / Interview


The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism: The Roots of Slavery, White Supremacy, and Capitalism in Seventeenth-Century North America and the Caribbean

Gerald Horne / Interview


Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World

Samuel Moyn / Interview


Bullshit Jobs: A Theory

David Graeber / Interview


Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor

Virginia Eubanks / Interview


The Divide: A Brief Guide to Global Inequality and its Solutions

Jason Hickel / Interview


Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore

Elizabeth Rush / Interview


The Bone and Sinew of the Land: America's Forgotten Black Pioneers and the Struggle for Equality

Anna-Lisa Cox / Interview


Mistaken Identity: Race and Class in the Age of Trump

Asad Haider / Interview


The Heritage: Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism

Howard Bryant / Interview


The World Come of Age: An Intellectual History of Liberation Theology

Lilian Calles Barger / Interview


Resisting Illegitimate Authority: A Thinking Person’s Guide to Being an Anti-Authoritarian - Strategies, Tools, and Models

Bruce E. Levine / Interview

 

A Happy Future Is a Thing of the Past: The Greek Crisis and Other Disasters

Pavlos Roufos / Interview


Behold, America: The Entangled History of ‘America First’ and ‘the American Dream’

Sarah Churchwell / Interview

 

Chuck's Favorite Books of 2018 Interview Playlist

 

Episode 1034

Gilets Jawns

Dec 15 2018
Dec 15 2018
Posted by Alexander Jerri

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

You all remember Leonard Cohen? He was alive not long ago. He wrote many songs including "Hallelujah," which has been covered by many singers, including, most famously, the tragically late Jeff Buckley.

Leonard sings about a secret chord that David played and it pleased the Lord. I've always wondered why it was secret and not sacred. "I've heard there was a sacred chord." Even sung that way, it still sounds like a secret, so you don't lose that concept. "I've heard there was this chord." Oh, it's a rumor? A secret? Illicit or elusive knowledge?

And what kind of secret is it, anyway? "It starts like this, the fourth the fifth the minor fall the major lift..." What kind of secret is that? He knows every interval in this chord he's only heard about and it's a secret? How does he know every interval in the secret chord? A chord a baffled king used at least 3000 years ago? Well, he's a kabbalist, we know that about Leonard Cohen. He got the knowledge somehow.

Ancient Jewish secret, huh?

"The baffled king composing Hallelujah." David, like Leonard, was a songwriter. Why baffled? Well, I've heard there's a secret doctrine, a pretty damn sacred secret doctrine about King David being insane.

Baffled king, mad king, the cosmos and the lord filled him. He was full of the lord. And he was insane with his love of God and his openness in song to God.

David, in his madness and love, decided he needed to sin in order to help God have a relationship of sin and redemption with him. Because he was too perfect a servant of God, he was too open to God, he was too full of God like as if to become one unto God!

David was too good. God couldn't handle it. And so David resolved to debase himself with sin, and take Bathsheba, the wife of Uriah the Hittite, and bed her in a sinful bed. So he could sin in the eyes God, and by penance be redeemed by God. God likes that. It makes him feel useful.

Talk about creating drama. But that's the kind of relationship they had. God and David. Symbiotically dysfunctional. David's 23d Psalm, you'll remember it if I start, A song of David: The lord is my shepherd, I shall not want, he maketh me etc etc, blah blah blah green pastures, blah blah blah still waters, blah blah blah valley of the shadow of death, blah blah blah fear no evil, rod and staff, set a table, anoint with oil, ah, "My cup runneth over." That's the King James translation.

... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
1034lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:20 - Live from Paris, journalist Cole Stangler traces the class lines running through France's Yellow Vest movement.

Cole wrote the articles What’s Really Behind France’s Yellow Vest Protest? for The Nation and “Yellow Vests” Against the “President of the Rich” for Jacobin.

 

10:05 - Writer Sohaila Abdulali talks about what we do (and don't) talk about when we talk about rape.

Sohaila is author of What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape from The New Press.

 

11:05 - Political scientist Neta C. Crawford examines the brutal, ongoing human cost of America's wars.

Neta is author of the paper Human Cost of the Post-9/11 Wars: Lethality and the Need for Transparency for Brown University's Watson Institute.

 

11:35 - Investigative journalist Yasha Levine exposes the greedy, vampiric heart of California's pistachio industry.

Yasha's documentary, Pistachio Wars: Killing California for a Snack Food is raising funds for post-production at Kickstarter right now. Help em out!

 

12:05 - Writer Jesse Bering explains what happens in the brain (and life) of the suicidal person.

Jesse is author of the book Suicidal: Why We Kill Ourselves from University of Chicago Press.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen sees the glass as entirely full.

Guess those Wellbutrins are kicking in.

 

Episode 1033

No Debate

Dec 8 2018