Manufacturing Dissent Since 1996
New interviews throughout the week
1020jarvensivuvaden

It's really difficult to have a sense of energy and material at the same time we are thinking about the economy. In the newspaper you read every day about the economy - but it never really discusses the material foundations of economic activity, it's mostly on the very abstract monetary level - profits and losses. That's the way we have been taught to consider the economy, and it's a huge task to change how we think.

Biophysical economist Paavo Järvensivu and philosopher Tere Vadén explore the near future economics of a world in capital and climate crisis - as an era of cheap energy comes to a close, and the consequences of burning carbon threatens human wellbeing, the state must lead a transition towards a new energy infrastructure.

Paavo and Tere are co-authors of the report Economic Transition Governance, a background document to a 2019 UN Global Sustainable Development Report.

 


Posted by Alexander Jerri
1011lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:20 - Journalist Jacob Hamburger explains why the new French left has old French left problems.

Jacob wrote the article Whose Populism? The Mixed Messages of La France Insoumise for Dissent.

 

10:05 - Historian Anna-Lisa Cox traces the westward journey of America's Black pioneers.

Anna-Lisa is author of The Bone and Sinew of the Land: America's Forgotten Black Pioneers and the Struggle for Equality from PublicAffairs.

 

11:05 - Journalist Eileen Truax explores the new battlegrounds in America's border wars.

Eileen is author of We Built the Wall: How the US Keeps Out Asylum Seekers from Mexico, Central America and Beyond from Verso.

 

12:05 - Journalist Yasha Levine looks behind the false front of Silicon Valley's corporate resistance.

Yasha wrote the article All EFF’d Up: Silicon Valley’s astroturf privacy shakedown for The Baffler.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen gets all tangled up in space and time.

 

Episode 1010

Lost Time

Jul 1
Posted by Alexander Jerri

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

There were several momentous legal cases heard this week, one about gerrymandering, one about public unions, one about keeping Muslims out of the country, and it was clear they were going to require careful consideration and intense analysis by the nation's most vital legal minds. Instead they were heard by the Supreme Court.

I'm appalled by SCROTUS, the Supreme Court Republicans of the United States. They're awful. And there are officially going to be five of them now. They're rotten, those SCROTUS.

I'm here to complain about Mitch McConnell stealing the Supreme Court seat from Obama. I'm here to say what everyone is already thinking and saying. But I'm here to say it on This Is Hell. I'll tell you what I think about Mitch McConnell. Now, if a Democrat had done a version of what Mitch did, and thwarted a Republican jerk from appointing a rightwing ideologue to the court, I would've said, Good job, comrade! Except, in Mitch's version, Obama wasn't a particularly left-leaning president, and Merrick Garland, whom Obama put forward as a sop to the GOP, anyway, was no left ideologue. But apparently being reasonable, compromising, polite and black are not things the GOP will allow to go unpunished. How many times did Obama learn that? Or, rather, experience it, because he never seemed to learn anything.

No Democratic leader would refuse a president his constitutional right to nominate a justice for a newly-empty seat, and, not since FDR at least, would any Democrat ever commit such a blatant violation of Constitutional and Congressional norms regarding the court. Certainly these days Dems wouldn't dare poke the GOP hornets' nest. They're keeping their powder dry. They got so much dry powder they don't know what to do with it all. And they're keeping it dry until the end of the world, which they think will be sooner if they keep their powder dry enough. Keep the powder dry to hasten the end times.

The GOP on the other hand is willing to burn their powder at the drop of a hat. They'll do anything to get what they want. The Dems are ready and willing to do nothing to get what they want, despite having done nothing, and yet not having got what they want. All the Dems have is a surplus of dry powder, over which they've erected a bulletproof dome to make sure it never ignites. Dry powder for dry powder's sake. There might not really even be any powder there.... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
1010lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:20 - Law professor Robert L. Tsai examines the right's anti-immigrant, demographic control machine.

Robert wrote the Boston Review article Trumpism Before Trump with Calvin TerBeek.

 

10:00 - Live from Mexico City, Laura Carlsen reports on the crises already facing Mexico's next president.

Laura previewed the elections in her latest report for Hecho en América.

 

10:35 - Political scientist Ed Burmila sees America's immigrant detainee crisis slipping out of sight in the future.

Ed wrote the Baffler article Out of Sight, Out of Our Minds.

 

11:05 - Historian Catherine Nixey explores the violent purging of the Classical world by early Christians.

Catherine is author of The Darkening Age: The Christian Destruction of the Classical World from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

 

12:05 - Economist Rob Larson explains why capitalism will always fail to deliver freedom for humanity.

Rob is author of Capitalism vs. Freedom: The Toll Road to Serfdom from Zero Books.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen is appalled by SCROTUS.

 

Episode 1009

IDPROLE

Jun 24
Posted by Alexander Jerri

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

The Jews, my people. Such a stiff-necked people. You want to own the Holocaust, I get it. You don't want to share the word "concentration camp." Yeah, that makes sense. Those little children at the southern border aren't being forced to do labor, so we can't call them labor camps. They're not being exterminated or worked to death, so we can't call them extermination camps or death camps. We can call them "internment camps," because it's like they're in prison. But not concentration camps? Because that's our word? Even though they're being concentrated into a camp? That's not enough for you? You think they invented the concentration camp just for Jews in Europe in the 30s and 40s? I won't go into the historical error you're making, there's a Slate article for that.

What I'm going to beat you up about is, just don't be so morally superior. Don't hold your suffering over others. We're on the verge of losing the special victim status associated with the Shoah, and holding onto "concentration camp" doesn't really help. All over Europe and here in the US, new rightwing nationalist groups are firmly establishing themselves. It's not just anti-Semitism they're peddling, either, it's anti-foreigner, whatever they decide a foreigner is. And I want them to know that, if they're concentrating people in camps, or if they're beating people up, or making anti-foreigner laws aimed at "strengthening the borders," whatever they want to call it, it does resemble the rise of fascism in Europe in the 20s and 30s of last century. This is what it looked like.

They want to say, "Look, this is a special problem, these Latins or Muslims, or whatever, so a little nativist suspicion and anti-immigrant rhetoric here or there is okay, it's not a sign we're on the slippery slope toward Hitler, Franco, Vichy or Mussolini. Let's at least rehabilitate love of country! Our country for us! America first. Is that so bad? At least we're not keeping people in concentration camps." Bee ess. It's the same old fascism they're constructing, and if you aren't behind calling them out for their attempts to put a white Christian dictatorship in place of our nominal democracy, take your silly asses home. Don't worry, they'll come for you later. Want to wait till you're packed into a cattle car to Wyoming to call them what they are? More fool you.

And my black friends, is it really so important, as... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
1009lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:20 - Historian Daniel Bessner explores the blindspots in George Soros's worldview.

Daniel wrote the article The Globalist: George Soros after the open society for N+1.

 

10:05 - Writer Asad Haider explains how a new politics of race and class can power collective action.

Asad is author of Mistaken Identity: Race and Class in the Age of Trump from Verso.

 

11:05 - Writer Thomas Frank tours the collapsing landscape of late-stage America.

Tom is author of Rendezvous with Oblivion: Reports from a Sinking Society from Metropolitan Books.

 

12:05 - Policy researcher Philip Mattera investigates the booming business of corporate wage theft.

Philip is author of the report Grand Theft Paycheck: The Large Corporations Shortchanging Their Workers' Wages from Good Jobs First.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen Presents Kanye's Choice Part 3: The Dumbening and the Smarting

Listen to Parts One and Two if you need to catch up.

 

Episode 1008

No Sphere

Jun 17
Posted by Alexander Jerri

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

Last week I talked about the artifacts by which we remember both the Shoah and the Captivity of black people in the west. This week I'm going to talk about their comparative aesthetics. The Shoah is mainly urban, industrial, scientific, Norse, Protestant, art deco, sado-masochistic/black leather, red, black and white. The slavery chapter of the Captivity is mainly represented in earth-tones, with hints of blue, and the dripping green of kudzu, rural, agrarian, folk, Southern Baptist, sun- dappled, outsider and itinerant artsy, colonial, linen, and bondage sadist.

The biblical character Moses figures in the liberation theology of both, though ironically more so in the Captivity than in the Shoah. The Shoah's iconography of liberation tends more toward the Maccabean than the Mosaic. Although there are both armies and solitary figures of liberation associated with both mass atrocities, in the Shoah the main figures of resistance, the partisans and the Allies, are armies, akin to the Maccabees if anything biblical, and the downfall of the bureaucratic/industrial enemy is a military one; while Harriet Tubman, guiding her people to freedom through the Underground Railroad as the Moses figure of the Captivity, looms large; liberation depends on the courage and perseverance of individual heroes in the face of interpersonal if pandemic human hatred, hatred that was enacted anew every time an individual crime against dark-skinned humans was committed.

While the portrait of Nazism is painted against a background of policies and laws under which a dormant, innate anti-Semitism was enabled to emerge, giving a great multitude of Europeans permission to commit the crimes they'd always wanted to commit, the institution of slavery was considered the economic end, the means to which was the manipulation of hatred that turned people against their better natures, although this diagram of hatred has since transformed to one more closely resembling the Nazi license model as the Captivity has moved from its slavery phase into its Black Codes, Jim Crow and current carceral/more obviously genocidal phases. Does society make us racists? Or does it merely allow us to act out our inborn hatred of the Other? The answer isn't limited to those choices, especially now that we no longer diagram human nature as reducible to a solid or binary thing but as a spectrum, and a fluid one... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
1008lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:20 - Neuroscientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore explores the new science of the teenage brain.

Sarah-Jayne is author of Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain from PublicAffairs.

 

10:00 - Historian Sean Guillory examines the bleak present (and future) of the Russian left.

Sean wrote the article Left in a Corner for Jacobin and makes the very recommended Sean's Russia Blog Podcast.

 

11:05 - Writer Mark Kurlansky traces the long, complicated, economic and social history of milk.

Mark is author of Milk! A 10,000-Year Food Fracas from Bloomsbury.

 

12:00 - Environmentalist Helena Norberg-Hodge calls for a movement towards economic localization.

Helena wrote the essay Localisation: A strategic solution to globalised authoritarianism for the Transnational Institute.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen shines up some atrocities to see his reflection.