Manufacturing Dissent Since 1996
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Episode 858

NOXI

Jul 18 2015
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John Pilger

Pretenders to radicalism: How Syriza betrayed Greece.

Journalist John Pilger surveys the aftermath of the Greek referendum / bailout agreement and finds a supplicant government that lost sight of class war, a global left mesmerized by the prospect of power, and a lesson for the future - reclaim sovereignty or live under imposed poverty.

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Delphine Schrank

Dissent in Burma, from the underground to the streets.

Journalist Delphine Schrank profiles life and resistance under military rule in Burma, from the economic and moral crimes of the ruling junta, to the creativity and resourcefulness of the freedom fighters pushing for democracy.

Delphine is author of the new book The Rebel of Rangoon: A Tale of Defiance and Deliverance in Burma from Public Affairs Books.

Interview Transcript via Antidote Zine

Delphineschrankbio

 

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Marc Lewis

Development, not recovery: Why addiction is not a disease.

Neuroscientist Marc Lewis challenges the disease model of understanding addiction - as well as the money-making industries propping it up - and proposes a new framework for understanding addiction based on neuroplasticity, psychology and personal development.

Marc is author of the new Public Affairs Books release The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction is Not a Disease.

Marclewisbio

 

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Heather Havrilesky

Not with a bang, but a swipe: The techpocalypse is already here.

Writer Heather Havrilesky reads two books on the future of technology and flips ahead to an apocalyptic hellscape of drones, hackers, phone-sized computers that transmit personal information to giant corporations, and terms of service agreements that nobody bothers to read.

Heather wrote the article Apocalypse Soon in the latest issue of The Baffler.

Heatherhavrileskybio

 

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Jeff Dorchen

Eating chips and watching videos in an age of robotardation.

Jeff Dorchen straddles the gulf between human potential and technological capacity, and gives it a name - robotardation. Population: cell phones, potato chip bags, video game players, non-cursive writers, unemployed artists, victims of mass extinctions, drone attacks and Fox News, and Stephen Hawking's voice.

Dorchen