THURSDAY 10AM: How Trump Stole 2020: The Hunt For America's Vanished Voters | Greg Palast
Manufacturing Dissent Since 1996
New interviews throughout the week
20200611ajaysinghchaudhury

If we really are serious about mitigating and adapting for climate change - because we're sick of this world, we're exhausted by this world, we want a different way of doing things, we want life to be better for people right now - it requires us to build up a tremendous political power, to rethink the subject of politics in climactic terms.

Writer Ajay Singh Chaudhary counters the idea that climate change will bring people in an unequal society together, and explains why the first step in saving ourselves from disaster is looking upwards at the capitalist elite steering the rest of us off a cliff.

Ajay wrote the article We’re Not in This Together for The Baffler.

 


Mar 9
Mar 5
Episode 1138

Under Silicon Valley.

Mar 3
Posted by Alexander Jerri

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

Disclaimer: an unholy slew of cultural references will follow.

The thought of Al Pacino as an Ashkenazi Jewish-accented Holocaust survivor made my sister not want to watch the new Amazon Prime show, Hunters, about Nazi-hunters in the late 70s, produced by Jordan Peele. She loves Peele, but didn’t like Pacino as Hoffa in The Irishman, and also, in a nod to identity politics, she wondered why they didn’t get a real Jew to play Nazi- hunting millionaire Meyer Offerman.

There’s a lot about the show that doesn’t work, and a lot that does. Pacino’s accent is not horrible. Saul Rubinek’s ebbs and flows. Carol Kane’s is perfect in a way I don’t understand why Rubinek’s isn’t. Josh Mostel, son of Zero, not Zoro, who played King Herod in the film of Jesus Christ Superstar – “prove to me that you’re no fool/walk across my swimming pool” – is perfect as Carol and Saul’s rabbi, although the writing doesn’t rise to the level of the performances. German actress Barbara Sukowa, who played Rosa Luxemburg in Margarethe von Trotta’s not- great biographical film of the Jewish anarchist, is featured in an episode as a possibly-wrongly executed possible Nazi.

Why this show? Why now? Because Nazis are coming out of the woodwork, all over the world, acting like “Nazi” is a valid lifestyle choice, and, somehow, whether or not it’s all right to punch them has been a persistent moral question. And that’s the big moral question of the show: is it all right to kill Nazis three decades after they committed their Naziness? Or does, as Nietzsche had it, the abyss gaze back into you? Do you turn into a monster if you hunt monsters and kill them? Another current show, The October Faction, tackles this question, and answers that, yes, monsters are people, too, and going around killing them is immoral. At least, it is in a world where monsters are people, too.

But those are vampires, warlocks and such. Not Nazis. In Hunters, the Nazis are irredeemable monsters. Mustache-twirling monsters. Obvious in their evil, evil in their declared ambitions. There’s even an idealized “Proud Boy” style monster. It’s a relevant show! It’s not anywhere as good as HBO’s Watchmen, though. I’m not even sure Hunters is good at... read more

Feb 25
Feb 24